GLBA

GLBA Compliance

Is your company regulated by GLBA Compliance Requirements?
Are you under a deadline to meet compliance requirements?
Are you uncertain how to start this complex and confusing project?
—No problem.

OUR TEAM OF EXPERTS CAN HELP YOU TO ACHIEVE COMPLIANCE.

If you do not have time or a skilled and qualified resource, we can help your organization in planning, assessing current and desired security posture, along with identifying all risks, vulnerabilities, and operational and processes driven fatal red flags, followed by working to deploy all required countermeasure security controls to reduce, mitigate, or transfer risk.

Since 2000, Our professional team members have assisted U.S. Federal Government Agencies, State of California Government Agencies, and Fortune 100, 500, and 1000 public and private world-class international companies to identify cyber security threats, vulnerabilities, business and processes gaps and red flag, and able to timely deployed security countermeasure solutions and/or compensating or alternative controls which reduce or eliminate security risks, threats, and vulnerabilities.

We specialize in Enterprise Security Strategies and Planning, Risk Assessment, Infrastructure and Web Application Cyber Security Threats Assessment, Cloud Security, Security Compliance Standard (SOX, PCI-DSS v3.1, HIPAA, FISMA, NIST-800), Security Awareness, Policy Program along with unique and hybrid expertise evaluating and assessing Vendors and Business Partner Security Risk Assessment. Our mission: Your Rock-Solid Security is our # 1 Priority. 

With our years of real world hands on work expertise, special skills and our unique methodologies, we can make your company “Hack-proof, Hack-resilient, Security-compliant!

What is GLBA Compliance?

The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA), also known as the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999, (Pub.L. 106-102, 113 Stat. 1338, enacted November 12, 1999) is an act of the 106th United States Congress (1999-2001) signed into law by President Bill Clinton which repealed part of the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933, opening up the market among banking companies,securities companies and insurance companies. The Glass-Steagall Act prohibited any one institution from acting as any combination of an investment bank, a commercial bank, and an insurance company.

The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act allowed commercial banks, investment banks, securities firms, and insurance companies to consolidate. For example, Citicorp (a commercial bank holding company) merged with Travelers Group (an insurance company) in 1998 to form the conglomerate Citigroup, a corporation combining banking, securities and insurance services under a house of brands that included Citibank, Smith Barney, Primerica, and Travelers. This combination, announced in 1998, would have violated the Glass-Steagall Act and the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 by combining securities, insurance, and banking, if not for a temporary waiver process.[1] The law was passed to legalize these mergers on a permanent basis. Historically, the combined industry has been known as the “financial services industry”.[citation needed]